How is gardening good for your health?

Indeed, the positive association with gardening was observed for a wide range of health outcomes, such as reductions in depression and anxiety symptoms, stress, mood disturbance, and BMI, as well as increases in quality of life, sense of community, physical activity levels, and cognitive function.

What are the physical and mental benefits of gardening?

Social and therapeutic horticulture

Reduce depression, anxiety and stress-related symptoms. Alleviate the symptoms of dementia, such as aggressive behaviour. Increase the ability to concentrate and engage. Reduce reliance on medication, self-harming behaviour.

How does gardening help fight diseases?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), moderate-intensity level activity for 2.5 hours each week can reduce the risk for obesity, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, heart disease, stroke, depression, colon cancer and premature death.

What are the emotional benefits of gardening?

Studies have found that the mental health benefits of gardening are extensive. Not only can regular gardening reduce mental health problems like depression and anxiety, but it can also reduce stress and combat high blood pressure, as well as improving overall physical fitness.

Does gardening help anxiety?

Studies have found gardening and horticultural therapy can: reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression. improve attention. interrupt harmful ruminations, a symptom of anxiety.

Does gardening improve mental health?

‌Gardening can improve many aspects of mental health, focus, and concentration. Improves mood. Gardening can make you feel more peaceful and content. Focusing your attention on the immediate tasks and details of gardening can reduce negative thoughts and feelings and can make you feel better in the moment.

How does gardening make you feel?

Scientists have discovered that the mycobacterium found in soil can improve brain functions while boosting moods. The mycobacterium vaccae found in the soil increases serotonin produced in the brain (also known as the “happy” chemical). By getting your hands dirty, you‘re also making your brain happy!